Bringing COBOL to the Modern World

COBOL is powering most of the critical infrastructure that involves any kind of monetary transaction. In this special interview conducted during the recent Open Mainframe Summit we talked about the relevance of COBOL today and the role of the new COBOL working group that was announced at the summit. Joining us were Cameron Seay Adjunct Professor at East Carolina University and Derek Lisinski of the Application Modernizing Group at Micro Focus. Micro Focus recently joined the Open Mainframe Project and is now also involved with the working group. .

Here is an edited version of the discussion.

Swapnil Bhartiya First of all Cam and Derek welcome to the show. If you look at COBOL its very old technology. Who is still using COBOL today Cam I would like to hear your insight first.

Cameron Seay Every large commercial bank I know of uses COBOL. Every large insurance company every large federal agency every large retailer uses COBOL to some degree and it processes a large percentage of the worlds financial transactions. For example if you go to Walmart and you make a sale that transaction is probably recorded using a COBOL program. So its used a lot a large percentage of the global business is still done in COBOL.

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