Java development on Fedora Linux

Java is a lot. Aside from being an island of Indonesia it is a large software development ecosystem. Java was released in January 1996. It is approaching its 25th birthday and its still a popular platform for enterprise and casual software development. Many things from banking to Minecraft are powered by Java development.

This article will guide you through all the individual components that make Java and how they interact. This article will also cover how Java is integrated in Fedora Linux and how you can manage different versions. Finally a small demonstration using the game Shattered Pixel Dungeon is provided.

The following subsections present a quick recap of a few important parts of the Java ecosystem.

Java is a strongly typed object oriented programming language. Its principle designer is James Gosling who worked at Sun and Java was officially announced in 1995. Java8217s design is strongly inspired by C and C but using a more streamlined syntax. Pointers are not present and parameters are passed-by-value. Integers and floats no longer have signed and unsigned variants and more complex objects like Strings are part of the base definition.

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