Software Innovation Prevails in Landmark Supreme Court Ruling in Google v. Oracle

In an important victory for software developers the Supreme Court ruled today that reimplementing an API is fair use under US copyright law. The Courts reasoning should apply to all cases where developers reimplement an API to enable interoperability or to allow developers to use familiar commands. This resolves years of uncertainty and will enable more competition and follow-on innovation in software.

Yes you would 8211 Credit Parker Higgins httpstwitter.comXOR.

This ruling arrives after more than ten years of litigation including two trials and two appellate rulings from the Federal Circuit. Mozilla together with other amici filed several briefs throughout this time because we believed the rulings were at odds with how software is developed and could hinder the industry. Fortunately in a 6-2 decision authored by Justice Breyer the Supreme Court overturned the Federal Circuits error.

When the case reached the Supreme Court Mozilla filed an amicus brief arguing that APIs should not be copyrightable or alternatively reimplementation of APIs should be covered by fair use. The Court took the second of these options.

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News Link: https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2021/04/05/software-innovation-prevails-in-landmark-supreme-court-ruling-in-google-v-oracle/.
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